CHW Staff Opportunity

The CHW is pleased to announce that we will be adding a one-year, full-time staff position to coordinate the next phase of our work in Rocky Mount. The full position description has been posted on the "Careers at Carolina" website: https://unc.peopleadmin.com/postings/124984 Applications and supporting materials are accepted only through this portal. The UNC-Chapel Hill Community Histories Workshop (communityhistories.org ) announces a one-year position in public history and public humanities to lead Rocky Mount Mills: From Adaptive Reuse to Public Engagement, a community history and archiving project funded through a grant from the National Historic Publications and Records Commission of the National Archives and Records Administration. Responsibilities of the Social Research Specialist/Project Coordinator include but are not necessarily limited to: *support project Principal Investigator, Professor Robert Allen *serve as project manager and team leader for the project, coordinating effort by all participants and contributing units *coordinate project administration with the staff of the UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies *coordinate the work of the project’s graduate fellow *working with...
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From Adaptive Reuse to Community History

From Adaptive Reuse to Community History: Why It Matters Here Historical Context Between 1885 and 1920, the economic, social, and cultural landscape of the southeastern Piedmont was transformed by what a contemporaneous commentator called the “Cotton Mill Campaign.” From Virginia to Alabama, thousands of textile mills and villages to house the families who worked in them seemed to sprout from the red clay. Nowhere was this transformation more pronounced than in North Carolina, where the number of mills increased five-fold. By the beginning of World War I, more than fifty thousand white men, women, and children (some younger than twelve) worked in mills. An even larger number of North Carolinians —white, black, and Native American— were connected to the mills in some way: growing, processing, selling, or transporting cotton; cooking in boarding houses and lunchrooms; caring for children; preaching in the mill churches; and teaching in the mill schools.[1]    The cotton mill boom was itself built on the modest success of pioneering industrialists...
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